Angel of Vatopedi

01_YuriBoyko_Angel of Vatopedi.jpg

In my search of the source material, I was traveling through the sites where it would be the most probable to experience the reverse perspective not only as a mind play, but also, if possible, to see it in a real-life utilitarian context, for example as a part of an architectural composition. In other words, how does a visual plane that employs the reverse perspective is perceived in a case when it is readily available and is outside of museum environment or distant observation during a religious ceremony.

Like a fresco that reflects early morning sun to shine it on those laboring up the steep steps day in and day out.

Reverse perspective

An issue of the reverse perspective is debated among art historians on a question of whether it was intentional or due to the insufficient knoladge at the time. Roughly up to 15th century before Italian Renaissance laid down theoretical foundation for the linear perspective, the depiction of subject matter on two dimensional plane often was diverging away from a viewer rather than converging into a distant point as it is common now. Images of Byzantine school of iconography represent this kind of perspective (e.g. a detail from an unidentified icon on the left).

In 2012, while in Moscow, I took this image as a response to a book on reverse perspective without planning or thinking about any specific project but rather reflecting on a different point of representation. Now, when I'm developing a body of work where a philosophic idea of experiencing the world by a human is centered inside of an observer rather than on an outside, I want to share my creative  process in a series of postings.